The Joy of Overhauling a Project

The Joy of Overhauling a Project

Starting a new project is exciting. It can be scary too, but this trepidation can be met with enthusiasm and eagerness, since you’re building something completely unique. It can be an arduous process but, equally, a fulfilling one. But what happens when all that hard work doesn’t pay off the way you expect? What if your project has to be redone altogether?

We’ve all been there. Acknowledging this doesn’t necessarily make the demolition process of the first draft easier to bear. I just wanted to put it out there to remind you that you’re not alone. Hey, it’s even happening to me right now. This is the third attempt I’ve made at writing this entry and it’s a tad irksome. So, if you’re experiencing something similar and are brimming with sadness or frustration, it’s okay. It happens to everyone who’s ever worked on anything, really.

At this point, unless you’re on a tight deadline, you might benefit from some time away from your project; to take a breather, as it were.

…Feel better? Okay.

I hope that time away helped you realize what I did: almost anything can be redone in a satisfying way. The key is detaching yourself enough from your first attempt to be willing to start anew, while concurrently retaining the passion you had for your work in the beginning. It’s a balancing act for sure but it can be done, and once you do there’s no holding you back. Unlike what might have been the case before, you can approach your second (or third, fourth, etc.) attempt with an understanding of what will and won’t work. Such wisdom doesn’t have to stifle your creativity but can instead help foster new ideas you might never have otherwise considered.

Of course, being more tense than optimistic about an overhaul is understandable if you’re on a deadline or are beholden to others. I can’t pretend that everyone will understand your situation (even if it’s justifiable), especially if money, resources, or someone else’s well-being are involved. In these cases you can either modify your original work to the best of your ability or, if it can’t be salvaged, redo it anyway. You can only do your best.

These are extreme cases, though. But whether the situation was cut-throat or not it can provide enhanced perspective and foster personal growth. Sometimes this makes the experience more valuable than it would have been if you’d knocked it out of the park on your first shot. With this in mind, you can approach your redesign with zest and just the right amount of cautiousness needed to succeed. We promise you won’t be disappointed when you’re well and truly done.

 

 

Greg Plante
webmaster@imaginativeimaging.com
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